Shared Blog Post – Experiencing a High Magnitude Punisher and Its Fallout – Eileen Anderson

< Updated 14JUL22 >

In her blog post of July 11th, 2022, Eileen Anderson of EileenandDogs describes how unexpectedly getting stung by a wasp dramatically changed her behavior. I have shared Eileen’s post on my blog because this same type of response can occur when our pets experience something they find punishing. Understand that what they experienced may not seem traumatic to you; however, how you perceived the incident is irrelevant if the injured party found the experience traumatic. Mammalian brains are designed to remember traumatic events FOREVER so we can avoid being hurt again. This is a deep-seated emotional response and typically cannot just be “trained away.” If you find your dog is suddenly afraid, you may better understand how they feel after reading Eileen’s post.

FMI – https://eileenanddogs.com/blog/2022/07/11/experiencing-high-magnitude-aversive-fallout/

Potential Causes for Reactivity (Shyness, Anxiety, Fear, and Terror) in a Dog

< Updated 22MAY22 >

< A short link for this page – https://bit.ly/Causes-Reactivity >

Reactivity in a dog is one of the most common reasons I see clients with behavioral concerns about their dog. Frequently, this is triggered by fear. Fear occurs on a continuum from mild shyness or timidity to anxiety, fear, and ultimately terror. Reactivity can also be caused by frustration, anger, and rage, another continuum. Even positive stress, or eustress, such as happiness that leads to hyper-excitement, may cause undesirable reactivity. Fear, anger, and hyper-excitement are emotional responses that may result in reactivity and aggression. While what we call “dog training” can work well for teaching a dog to respond to a cue like sit or down, emotional responses cannot be “trained” away. When a dog or person is in an extreme emotional state, they are under stress, making learning very difficult, if not impossible. When experiencing this level of stress, the dog is under the influence of the “fight or flight response” and is solely concerned about its survival.

A dog can be fearful for many reasons:

Genetics – If either parent were on the fear spectrum, all of their offspring would likely be somewhere on the spectrum. Knowing if either of a dog’s parents is fearful can be very helpful in determining how and if we can help them. If you have not already done so, I recommend talking to the breeder or the rescue or shelter where you obtained your dog. However, understand they may not have information or may misinterpret what they do know.

Medical Conditions – A medical issue can often trigger a sudden behavior change. Pain and any physical or emotional discomfort can cause behavioral changes in pets. Disorders of the nervous, endocrine, reproductive, and gastrointestinal systems can also affect your pet’s behavior.

Tick-borne diseases have become much more prevalent in Maine. A few years ago, we only needed to worry about Lyme disease. Today we also need to be concerned about Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, Borrelia miyamotoi, Ehrlichiosis, Powassan Encephalitis, and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. These diseases can cause changes in behavior, including; anorexia, anxiety, confusion, depression, fatigue, malaise, and other subtle mental disorders. I have experienced this with my dog Muppy who has had Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. Both times she exhibited fearful behavior as the only sign of infection. However, once treated by her veterinarian, her behavior returned to normal.

I recommend that a veterinarian rule out any medical issues for fearful behavior before addressing it as a behavioral problem. If your veterinarian does not have experience with treating behavior, I recommend that you see Dr. Christine Calder, a Veterinary Behaviorist practicing in Maine. [ Calder Veterinary Behavior Services, (207) 298-4375, www.caldervbs.com]

Socialization – A puppy has a critical socialization and habituation period that begins when three weeks old and ends between 12 to 16 weeks of age. During this period, a puppy is typically very open to gentle exposure to novel stimuli set up to create a positive association. A puppy should always be given a choice as to whether or not they interact with someone or something. Forced interactions may cause a traumatic experience.

Ideally, you want to carefully expose a puppy to everything it will encounter in its life before they reach 12 to 16 weeks of age. However, if your puppy is acting fearfully during this period, it may be a sign of fear due to a medical issue or genetic issue, in which case I recommend you see your veterinarian immediately.

You can attempt remedial socialization after 16 weeks of age, but it requires a well-thought-out plan. This is not typically a DIY project, and I recommend you seek the services of a credentialed canine behavior consultant or a veterinary behaviorist.

Past or Recent Physical, Mental or Emotional Trauma – A dog’s brain works similar to ours; it is designed to permanently record any distressing experience in one trial to avoid that situation in the future. The next time the dog is exposed to whatever caused the trauma, it may try to flee, freeze in place, or fight if they have no other choice.

Trauma can be physical or emotional. It is vital to understand that only the dogs’ perception matters. In other words, while we might believe that something is not scary or painful, if our dog does find that “something” causes discomfort or is frightening, that is the reality from their perspective. This is a time when our opinion does not matter.

The problem with helping our dog get past a  traumatic event is that we may not even know when it occurred, and the dog has no way to tell us. Nor can our dog provide us with any details about the event. For example, suppose your dog is reactive to a specific individual. It could be due to their appearance, behavior, scent, or sounds they made. It could even be due to something in the environment which your dog associated with the individual. As you can see, appearance, behavior, scent, sound, and the environment open up a wide range of possible triggers. What your dog is reacting to may even be a combination of several things, further complicating matters.

Unfortunately, we may never know what our dog fears unless we witness the triggering event. For example, my first dog suddenly became afraid of her water dish and would not drink from it or approach it. Fortunately, I did witness what happened. It was winter, and the air in our home was very dry. We were all in the living room, where the floor was covered with a thick shag carpet. My dog ran along the carpet to her steel water bowl, which was at the edge of the carpet in the dining room, which was not carpeted. She lowered her head to get a drink which caused her to yelp and run away back into the living room. I walked across the carpet, bent down to look at the bowl, touched it, and received a static shock. It was not something I was expecting, but it clearly explained why my dog was suddenly afraid of her dish. Fortunately, I got her drinking again by switching to a non-metal dish and placing it in another location. However, suppose I had not seen that incident in its entirety. In that case, I might never have determined why Trivia suddenly became afraid of her water bowl.

Thunderstorms can be a traumatic event for some dogs creating a lifelong fear. We presume they are reacting to the thunder or lightning, but that is not always the case. Some dogs start reacting before they hear thunder or see a lightning bolt. For example, a friend had a dog who became afraid of storms when they lived in a home struck by lightning. After that,  a clap of thunder or bolt of lightning caused the dog to run to the basement. However, over time the dog’s fear generalized to other typical things that occur during a thunderstorm, such as trees blowing in the wind. Therefore, it is essential to understand that any fear can generalize beyond the initial trigger.

Some of the more typical traumas experienced by dogs include;

  • Physical injury such as a fall, being hit by a car or being bitten by another animal.
  • Physical abuse such as being hit or kicked by a person or being subjected to training methods and tools designed to force compliance through pain such as shock, prong, or choke collars.
  • Emotional trauma is often associated with physical injuries and abuse. However, even yelling at a dog has the potential to create an unforgettable fear. Likewise, even angry body language expressed by a person can create emotional trauma.

Not all incidents of physical or emotional trauma will cause fear. Whether or not it does depends on the event, the individual dog, and its previous history.

The most important thing to remember when helping a dog overcome anxiety is that the dog gets to decide what causes its fear. Our opinion does not matter.

Addressing Fear – The first two steps in determining why your dog is fearful are; ruling out any potential genetic or medical issues. Neither training nor behavior modification will be helpful until the medical issues are resolved.

The third step is to manage the dog and its environment to prevent exposure to anything that could trigger their fear. In my experience, a well-designed behavior modification protocol and appropriate behavioral medications are almost always necessary when treating anxiety and aggression.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do?http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful?http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Essential Handouts On Body Language, and Canine and Human Behavior from Dr. Sophia Yinhttps://bit.ly/YinBodyLang

Shared Blog Post – Reactivity Misunderstood – https://bit.ly/ReactivityMisunderstood

Shared Blog Post – the misunderstanding of time by Nancy Tannerhttp://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2016/11/16/shared-blog-post-the-misunderstanding-of-time-by-nancy-tanner/

What Is A Pet Behavior Consultant? – http://bit.ly/WhatIsPetBhxConsulting

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stresshttp://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

The emotional toll of a reactive dog by Jay Gurden in Dog’s Today – http://bit.ly/SharedGurenEmotional

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

Canine Behavior: Myths & Facts – http://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2016/03/27/podcast-canine-behavior-myths-and-facts/

Pet Behavior, Vets & The AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinichttp://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2016/03/13/podcast-the-woof-meow-show-pet-behavior-vets-the-aaha-canine-and-feline-behavior-management-guidelines-with-dr-dave-cloutier-from-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

Dog Training Questions for Don and Kate with special guest host Dr. Mark Hanks – part 3http://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2015/07/27/blog-post-27jul15-podcast-dog-training-questions-for-don-and-kate-with-special-guest-host-dr-mark-hanks-part-3/

The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collarshttp://bit.ly/ShockPodcast

The Pet Professional Guild and the Shock-Free Coalition with Niki Tudgehttp://bit.ly/PodCastShockFree-NikiTudge-2017

What’s Shocking About Shock – What Science Tells Us About the Use of Shock in Dog Traininghttp://bit.ly/WfMw-WhatShock-27JUL19

Podcast – Charlee and the Electronic Shock Containment System w-Dan Antolechttps://bit.ly/Blog-Charlee_E-Fence

To Find A Qualified and Credential Animal Behavioral Specialist

American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) https://www.dacvb.org/search/custom.asp

Animal Behavior Society ( ABS ) Certified Applied Animal Behavior Consultants – http://www.animalbehaviorsociety.org/web/applied-behavior-caab-directory.php

Pet Professional Accreditation Board (PPAB)https://www.credentialingboard.com/Professionals

________________________________________________________________________

Don Hanson lives in Bangor, Maine, where he is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) and the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. He is a Professional Canine Behavior Consultant (PCBC-A) accredited by the Pet Professional Accreditation Board (PPAB) and a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP). Don is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG), where he serves on the Board of Directors and Steering Committee and chairs the Advocacy Committee. He is also a founding director of Pet Advocacy International (PIAI). In addition, Don produces and co-hosts The Woof Meow Show podcast, available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com. The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©22MAY22, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Shared Blog Post – Why Counterconditioning “Doesn’t Work” or How to Help Ensure Counterconditioning Will Work

< Updated 11NOV21>

Angelica Steinker of Courteous Canine, Inc. wrote a brilliant article entitled Why Counterconditioning “Doesn’t Work” for the May 2015 issue of BARKS from the Guild, the professional journal of the Pet Professional Guild. Today the article was posted on the BARKS blog. My only criticism is, I think a better title would have been “How to Help Ensure Counterconditioning Will Work.”

In this article, the author discusses the typical reason a counterconditioning protocol fails; user error. In my experience, far too often, people with a fearful pet are in such a hurry to help their pet that they miss the keys to success that Steinker outlines in her article. The steps she describes can dramatically increase the odds of counterconditioning relieving the dog’s anxiety. The core message is the animal being counter conditioned MUST feel safe and relaxed.

This is a MUST READ for anyone working with fearful animals.

< Click here to read on the BARKS blog >

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful?http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Introduction to Canine Communication http://bit.ly/CanineComm

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stresshttp://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Shared Blog Post – the misunderstanding of time by Nancy Tannerhttp://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2016/11/16/shared-blog-post-the-misunderstanding-of-time-by-nancy-tanner/

The emotional toll of a reactive dog by Jay Gurden in Dog’s Today – http://bit.ly/SharedGurenEmotional

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

Anxiety, Fears & Phobias with Dr. Christine Calderhttps://bit.ly/WfMw-AnxFrPhbiaDrCalder

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine, where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is also the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. Don is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC), and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG), where he serves on the Board of Directors and Steering Committee and chairs the Advocacy Committee and The Shock-Free Coalition ( shockfree.org ). Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 and is streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©11NOV21, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Preparing for the Holidays; Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, & New Years

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 18OCT20 >

< A short link for this page – http://bit.ly/WfMwHolidayPrep >

The last three months of the year are often your favorite or least favorite time of year. It is a time filled with holidays, more guests in our home than usual, frantic activity, hectic schedules, and yes, stress, and not the good kind but unpleasant distress. All of these things can affect our pets every bit as much as they affect us. In this show, Kate and Don will be discussing ways you can make this time of year less stressful for both your and your pets. We’ll address Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

You can listen to The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts, at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple podcast app.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info

Don Hanson & Kate Dutra
Green Acres Kennel Shop & The Woof Meow Show
Bangor, ME
(207) 945-6841
https://www.greenacreskennel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/GreenAcresKennelShop/
https://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/
https://www.facebook.com/WoofMeowShow/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

 Halloween Tips for Pets and Their People – http://bit.ly/Halloween-Pets

Preparing Your Pets for the Holidayshttp://blog.greenacreskennel.com/2016/01/01/preparing-your-pets-for-the-holidays/

 Other Resources

Mighty Dog Graphics Halloween Postershttps://www.facebook.com/mightydoggraphics/posts/the-halloween-collection-/1328779170582929/

©18OCT20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Anxiety, Fears & Phobias with Dr. Christine Calder

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 09FEB21 >

< A short link for this page – https://bit.ly/WfMw-AnxFrPhbiaDrCalder >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from June 6th, 2020, Don talks with Veterinary Behaviorist Dr. Christine Calder about anxiety, fears, and phobias in pets. We start with a discussion of the multitude of words used to describe fear in our pets; anxiety, nervous, shy, skittish, timid, and more and then discuss how pets indicate they are afraid through body language and their actions. We also discuss extreme fear, phobias, specifically noise, storm, and firework phobias. Lastly, we offer suggestions to help you help your pet.

If your pet is afraid of summer storms or fireworks, you will not want to miss this show

Contact Info for Dr. Calder

Business: Calder Veterinary Behavior Services
Address:
Phone: (207) 298-4375
Email: reception@caldervbs.com
Websitewww.caldervbs.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Christine-Calder-DVM-DACVB-Veterinary-Behaviorist-104864721012254/

More info on Dr. Calder from the January 2020 issue of Downeast Dog Newshttps://downeastdognews.villagesoup.com/p/what-is-a-veterinary-behaviorist/1846547

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Crate Habituation to Reduce Anxietyhttp://bit.ly/CrateHabituation

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? – WWM – APR2017 – http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts )

Podcast – Introducing Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s 1st Veterinary Behaviorist – http://bit.ly/WMw-DrCalderVetBhx

Podcast – Separation Anxiety in Dogs with Dr. Christine Calderhttps://bit.ly/WfMw-SepAnxDrCalder

 

©17JUN20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Separation Anxiety in Dogs with Dr. Christine Calder

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 09FEB21 >

< A short link for this page –
https://bit.ly/WfMw-SepAnxDrCalder >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from May 30th, 2020, Don talks with Veterinary Behaviorist Dr. Christine Calder about separation anxiety in dogs. Separation Anxiety is a panic disorder in dogs that cannot cope with being left alone. These dogs are not misbehaving to get revenge but are suffering.

During the show, we discuss separation anxiety and its symptoms, sharing experiences with mild and extreme cases. We discuss which dogs are more likely to suffer from separation anxiety and address other disorders that may have some of the same symptoms. We discuss treatment options and things one can do to prevent separation anxiety.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts, at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple iTunes store.

Contact Info for Dr. Calder

Business: Calder Veterinary Behavior Services
Address:
Phone: (207) 298-4375
Email: reception@caldervbs.com
Websitewww.caldervbs.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Christine-Calder-DVM-DACVB-Veterinary-Behaviorist-104864721012254/

More info on Dr. Calder from the January 2020 issue of Downeast Dog Newshttps://downeastdognews.villagesoup.com/p/what-is-a-veterinary-behaviorist/1846547

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

 Alone Traininghttp://bit.ly/AloneTraining

Crate Habituation to Reduce Anxietyhttp://bit.ly/CrateHabituation

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Preventing separation anxiety – Teaching your dog to cope with being alonehttp://bit.ly/PrevSepAnx

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts )

Podcast – Introducing Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s 1st Veterinary Behaviorist – http://bit.ly/WMw-DrCalderVetBhx

Podcast – Anxiety, Fears & Phobias with Dr. Christine Calderhttps://bit.ly/WfMw-AnxFrPhbiaDrCalder

From Downeast Dog News

Separation Anxiety (Part 1) – What is it? –  https://bit.ly/SepAnx-Calder-1

Separation Anxiety Treatment (Part 2) – https://bit.ly/SepAnx-Calder-2

©17JUN20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Do I Need a Dog Trainer or a “Behaviorist”?

< A version of this article was published in the November 2019 issue of Downeast Dog News>

< Updated 09FEB21 >

< A short link to this page – http://bit.ly/WWM-Trainer-Behaviorist >

Dogs do not come with written instructions, and whether you have an 8-week old puppy, a six-year-old rescue dog, or anything in between having a relationship with a professional and accredited dog training or behavior expert can be your greatest asset.

Dog trainers typically teach you how to train your dog to be a great companion. They will address house-training, bite inhibition, jumping, and socialization with puppies and skills like teaching sit, down, stay, come, heel, leave it, and attention. Dog training is not a licensed profession, so you need to do your research carefully before making a selection. You can learn more at these links

If you have a dog with anxiety, fear, or aggression issues, you may need more than an accredited, professional dog trainer. In, fact if you are experiencing any of these issues, you should start with a visit to your veterinarian as there are medical issues that could be contributing to your dog’s undesired behavior. Any medical issue causing pain or discomfort can contribute to aggression. Other medical problems that can affect behavior include endocrine and neurological disorders and even tick-borne diseases.

Aggressive behavior is often an emotional response (anger or fear), and training alone may not be helpful. For example, a dog who has been trained in a wide variety of scenarios may well be able to sit on a single visual or verbal cue, but when under stress they may not respond to the cues you give. For example, you may be able to recite Shakespeare or solve differential equations, but your ability to do so when stressed may make it doing those tasks very difficult. We need to recognize and accept that a reactive dog is stressed and uncomfortable.

If your veterinarian rules out a medical reason for your dog’s behavior, you will want to seek the assistance of a professional credentialed to work with behavior cases. There are three levels of professionals to consider.

At the top of the list is a Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. This is a veterinarian that has completed additional training in behavior and is entitled to use the term “Veterinary Behaviorist’ and use the initials DACVB after their name. They will be experienced in training, behavior modification, and in the use of pharmaceuticals to aid in treating behavioral issues. As of the Fall of 2019, Maine has its first Veterinary Behaviorist in the state, Christine D. Calder DVM DACVB. [ FMI – Introducing Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s 1st Veterinary Behaviorist – http://bit.ly/WMw-DrCalderVetBhx ]

Next on the list are individuals who are credentialed by the Animal Behavior Society. They usually have a doctorate or master’s degree in animal behavior and have passed an exam that then allows them to use the title Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (CAAB or ACAAB). You can find a list of these individuals at http://www.animalbehaviorsociety.org/web/applied-behavior-caab-directory.php. I am not aware of any currently practicing in Maine.

At the next tier are those like myself that are credentialed as Behavior Consultants. Although people occasionally refer to me as a behaviorist, I am not. The only people that should be using the title “behaviorist” are those that are credentialed by the Animal Behavior Society or the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. There are three independent accrediting bodies that credential people like myself doing behavioral work listed below.

Like dog training, behavior consulting is not a licensed profession, so please verify the credentials of whomever you select to help your dog. If they recommend the use of any type of aversive (shock collar, choke collar, prong collar, spray bottle, dominance downs), anything meant to punish, look for someone else. Punishing your dog is only likely to make their aggression worse and more dangerous.

Lastly, you might want to review a past column of mine at the link below.

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do?http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

What Is Dog Training?http://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining

How to Choose a Dog Trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer

Maine Dog Trainers That I Recommendhttp://bit.ly/MEDogTrnrs

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do?http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

Introducing Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s 1st Veterinary Behavioristhttp://bit.ly/WMw-DrCalderVetBhx

Web Sites

American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB)https://www.dacvb.org/

American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB)https://avsab.org/

Animal Behavior Society – https://www.animalbehaviorsociety.org/web/index.php

Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers (CCPDT)https://www.ccpdt.org/

International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABC)https://m.iaabc.org/

Midcoast Humane – https://midcoasthumane.org/behavior/

Pet Professional Accreditation Board (PPAB)https://www.credentialingboard.com/

__________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, ME where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). Don is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG) and is committed to PPG’s Guiding Principles and the Pain-Free, Force-Free, and Fear-Free training, management, and care of all pets. Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 and is streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/, the Apple Podcast app, and at Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

09FEB21, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Remedial Socialization – The Watch the World Game

The original idea for this protocol was developed by Laura Van Dyne CPDT-KA, The Canine Consultant LLC, Carbondale, CO.

OBJECTIVE: To help a neo-phobic dog habituate to novel people in novel environments

 

Dog/handler teams are appropriate for this exercise when:

  • The dog is well bonded with and trusting of the handler.
  • The handler is very sure that this exercise will work. If there is any doubt, consult with a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC) that is experienced in working with fearful and reactive dogs before proceeding.

 

The handler will need:

  • To read the recommended resources at the end of this document.
  • A hungry dog with a properly fitting harness or collar, one that they cannot remove or slip off. Shock, choke, or prong collars should NEVER be used.
  • A standard, 6-foot leash.
  • High value treats such as freeze-dried liver, meat, or cheese.
  • A vehicle with a door that can be opened so the dog and person can sit inside the vehicle together (hatchback or van with sliding side door) facing outward with the door open.
  • A parking lot with an appropriate level of activity, little or no action at first that is sufficiently large that you can position your car several yards away from any activity.

 

When to Start:

  • During a quiet time.
    • Sunday morning, unless it’s a church parking lot.
  • Park at a distant point with the door for sitting facing the parking lot.
  • Sit inside with the dog either tethered or securely in hand.
  • Give treats to the dog as long as the dog is not reactive.
  • The goal is for the dog to see something in the distance and anticipate a yummy treat

Training Sessions:

  • Are short and very fun – quit before the dog is sated, typically within five minutes.
  • Happen frequently and repeated in the same location until successful (don’t go to parking lot #2 until your dog is non-reactive and content in parking lot #1).
  • Are at the beginning level of difficulty until the dog sees something new and promptly looks toward its handler for the yummy treat.
  • Are only gradually increased in difficulty as the dog is successful.

 

The goal is to be able to:

  • Sit in front of a busy grocery store with different types of people, grocery carts, cars, etc. passing by. Ideally, some of the people are speaking other languages and are of different nationalities

Remember Thus far – the team is still cocooned within the safety of the vehicle

 

Graduate out of the car:

  • Only when assured of success.
  • Perhaps in the original parking lot (#1), at the distant (station #1) location.
  • Step out of the car and simply stand there holding the leash securely in hand, if the dog is comfortable it should step out and stay with you to get more treats (Stay at this level for as many repetitions as necessary).
  • Graduate to walking around the car.
  • With success move closer to the action in future sessions.

 

Graduate to an outside location:

  • Find an appropriate bench or take something to sit on (Suggestion-have the dog sitting next to its person; it’s a more secure place than being removed to the ground).
  • Choose a place that is so easy; your dog is practically guaranteed to be non-fearful and non-reactive – maybe it’s just a quiet place – no people, vehicles, etc. at first
  • Gradually increase the difficulty – Over Practice Success!

 

What could go wrong?

  • Someone passing by could want to, ‘Pet the dog’ or come to visit with the person. The cuter and smaller dogs will be more attractive to passersby.
  • Sometimes, for safety and success the handler may have to be assertive to the point of rude to keep people away**
  • Bring a helper to run interference if necessary.
  • If the handler cannot read the stress level of the dog accurately, the dog could get worse!
  • “Life Happens” – at any time, if things go awry, leave.

**Comment:

Many people in the general public think they are a dog person, “Dogs love me!” and they move in, forward facing, staring at the dog, with their hands reaching for the dog’s face (actually doing all the wrong things!). A handler comment like, “Please don’t approach, my dog is fearful.” seems to stimulate the worst in passersby so the handler may have to interrupt and, perhaps, cross the border of polite behavior to prevent problems.

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

 

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? – WWM – APR2017 – http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Remedial Socialization – Objects – Bring the Junkyard Homehttp://bit.ly/RemedialSocializationObjects

Reward Based Training versus Aversiveshttp://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stress – http://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

What Is A Pet Behavior Consultant? – http://bit.ly/WhatIsPetBhxConsulting

What Should I Do When My Dog Does Not Let Me Take Something They Have Stolen and Snaps or Tries to Bite Me?http://bit.ly/StealGuardGrowlSnap

What Should I Do When My Dog Growls?http://bit.ly/DogGrowls

©11SEP18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Podcast-How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals Can Help My Pets with Julianna Carella

< A short link to this page – http://bit.ly/Wfmw-Hemp-Podcast2 >

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from June 23, 2018 Kate and Don interview Julianna Carella, CEO and Founder of Treatibles and Auntie Dolores. We discuss the use of hemp-derived phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals and their ability to offer dogs relief from anxiety, arthritis, pain, inflammation, seizures, nausea, motion sickness and even their ability to help those with cancer. We discuss the science behind these products, their safety, and what one should look for when selecting a Phytocannabinoid Nutraceutical for their pet.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info

Address: 1455 North McDowell Blvd, Suite B, Petaluma, CA 94954

Phone: (415) 579-2230

Website: https://treatibles.com/http://auntiedolores.com

Email: info@treatibles.com

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/treatibles/https://www.facebook.com/AuntieDoloresEdibles/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals May Help Your Petshttp://bit.ly/BLOG-Hemp-CBD-PRO-for-pets

 

©23JUN18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Pet Health & Wellness – How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals May Help Your Pets

< Updated 11JUN19 >

< A version of this article was published in the July 2018 issue of Downeast Dog News >

< You may listen to a podcast on this topic which aired on The Woof Meow Show at – http://bit.ly/WfMw-Hemp-Podcast2 >

You may have noticed that the use of marijuana and hemp-based products are being promoted for medical and health reasons for

Muppy & Don 2017

both people and pets. Research indicates that phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals can be very useful in helping with allergies1, anxiety2,11, arthritis3,4,11, behavioral issues5,11, depression2, epilepsy and seizures5,6,11, inflammation7, joint health3,4, digestion, joint mobility11, nausea8,9, and pain relief and management10,11. Anecdotal evidence indicates cannabinoids may also be useful in increasing appetite, improving digestion, slowing tumor growth, and providing end of life comfort. A scientific report in the Spring 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) reviewed how 631 pet owners used cannabinoids with their pets12. Commonly reported benefits of cannabinoids were; provided pain relief, aided with sleep, helped relieve anxiety, offered nervous system support, reduced inflammation,  reduced seizures or convulsions, reduced vomiting or nausea, helped suppress muscle spasms, aided digestion, helped with thunderstorm or fireworks phobia, inhibited cell growth in tumors and cancer cells, and helped with skin conditions.

What is the difference between hemp and marijuana?

While hemp and marijuana are both plants in the Cannabis family, they are not the same. The appearance of these two plants are very different, as is how they are cultivated. Most importantly, the chemical makeup of marijuana and hemp is very different. Marijuana is probably best known for containing a cannabinoid called THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana which can cause one to “get high.” Marijuana has a high THC content (5 to 35%) while the THC content of Hemp is less than 0.3%. THC content is critical as THC can be moderate to severely toxic to dogs13,14. Common signs of THC toxicity are: severe depression, walking drunk, lethargy, coma, low heart rate, low blood pressure, respiratory depression, dilated pupils, coma, hyperactivity, vocalization, and seizures.

What are phytocannabinoids?

Cannabinoids are substances that occur naturally in both hemp and marijuana. There are 66 different types of cannabinoids. One is THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana. Cannabidiol (CBD), is the most abundant of the cannabinoids and can make up as much of 45% of the resin extracted from the cannabis plant. CBD is believed to have anti-anxiety effects and may counteract the psychoactive effects of THC. Since there is now a CBD based drug undergoing clinical trials, the term PRO (Phytocannabinoid Rich Oil) is being used for phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals instead of CBD.

How do phytocannabinoids work?

All animals have an endocannabinoid system that works with the bodies physiological, neurological, and immunological systems. Our bodies produce endocannabinoids which fit into specialized receptors throughout the body. In the dog, CB1 receptors are found in the brain, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, muscles, reproductive organs, and vascular system. CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in the bone marrow, brain stem, gall bladder, liver, and pancreas. CB2 receptors are found in parts of the brain, bones, skin and the spleen. Cannabinoid receptors in your dog’s brain play a role in the Cerebral Cortex (memory, thinking, awareness, and consciousness), the Hypothalamus (metabolic processes, appetite), the Amygdala (regulation of emotions), the Hippocampus (memory and recall), the Basal Ganglia (motor skills and learning), the Cerebellum (muscle control and coordination), and the Brain Stem (reflexes, heart rate, blood pressure, pain sensation and muscle tone). Producing adequate numbers of endocannabinoids is essential to good health. When the body does not produce enough endocannabinoids due to poor health, we can supplement them with phytocannabinoids derived from hemp.

Are phytocannabinoids right for your pet?

Whether or not phytocannabinoids are right for your pet is something that only you can decide, and I would suggest you do so only after discussing their use with your veterinarian. At the end of 2017, the World Health Organization issued a report15 indicating that CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential, and in several clinical trials has been shown to effectively treat seizures. Research suggests that CBD/PRO nutraceuticals may be useful in treating a number of other medical conditions and have a good safety profile.

Buyer Beware!

The buzz over CBD/Pro products is enormous, so it is a “seller’s market.” Whenever that happens, it is not uncommon for some unreliable companies to get into the business. Before adding these products to our offerings at our store, we did a great deal of due diligence to select a company with a known track record and a commitment to quality and education. I would advise you to spend some time doing your own research before you buy a product or, talk to your veterinarian or a pet care professional you trust. Whatever you do, do NOT use marijuana you are growing yourself or that you buy from the couple down the road. You could kill your dog.

Footnotes and References

 

1 Cannabinoid receptor type 1 and 2 expression in the skin of healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitishttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22738050

2 Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativahttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24923339

3 The nonpsychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritishttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10920191

4 Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in osteoarthritis pain – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24494687

5 Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22520455

6 The cannabinoids as potential antiepilepticshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6975285

7 Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammationhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19199042

8 Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis and its synthetic dimethylheptyl homolog suppress nausea in an experimental model with ratshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11973447

9 Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis, attenuates vomiting and nausea-like behaviour via indirect agonism of 5-HT(1A) somatodendritic autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleushttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21827451

10 Non‐psychoactive cannabinoids modulate the descending pathway of antinociception in anaesthetized rats through several mechanisms of action – https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01063.x

11 The Effective Pain Treatment Your Vet May Not Want to Talk About – In this post from June 9th, Dr. Karen Becker discusses studies on the use of CBD oil (Phytocannabinoids) for the treatment of osteoarthritis, epilepsy, and pain management. – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/06/09/cbd-for-dogs-osteoarthritis-epilepsy-treatment.aspx

12 Scientific Report – Consumers Perceptions of Hemp Products for Animals. AHVMA Journal, Volume 42, Spring 2016 – https://www.ahvma.org/wp-content/uploads/AHVMA-2016-V42-Hemp-Article.pdf

13 Pet Poison Helpline – Marijuanahttp://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/marijuana/

14 Veterinarians see more cases of pets ingesting marijuana – News Center Maine – https://www.newscentermaine.com/article/news/local/veterinarians-see-more-cases-of-pets-ingesting-marijuana/97-559585825

15 World Health Organization Report on Cannabidiol (CBD)http://www.who.int/medicines/access/controlled-substances/5.2_CBD.pdf

 

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Other Trusted Resources

JAVAM News – Veterinary marijuana?, With pet owners already using the drug as medicine, veterinarians need to join the debate, May 13, 2013 – https://www.avma.org/news/javmanews/pages/130615a.aspx

VIDEO: Dr. Gary Richter, of Holistic Veterinary Care in #Oakland, discusses medical benefits of cannabis CBD treats for dogshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoyEg4uiq_A

Pot for Pets: Medical Uses of Marijuana in Companion Animals – Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. Rob Silverhttps://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/02/08/medical-marijuana-uses.aspx

 

 

Books

Medical Marijuana and Your Pet: The Definitive Guide by Dr. Rob Silver, Lulu Publishing Service, 2015, – http://www.wellpetdispensary.com/for-dogs/treats-n-books-n-stuff/medical-marijuana-and-your-pet-the-definitive-guide-download-free-excerpts/

 

Web Sites

 

YouTube

 

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He produces and co- hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on The Pulse AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonradio.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. A list of upcoming shows and podcasts of past shows can be found at www.woofmeowshow.com. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com. He is committed to pet care and pet training that is free of pain, force, and fear. The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©15-Jun-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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